Search This Blog

Sunday, December 21, 2014

Sanding and Curved Drawer Pulls

Not too much going on with all the holiday dinners and shopping.   I have been sanding the top and drawer fronts so that all of the table will be at 220 grit before finishing.

Soon my finishing supplies will be delivered and I will put together some videos on a new finishing process that I am learning.   Timothy Garland, a furniture restorer in Lincolnshire UK is teaching me the traditional methods that he uses.  These are the methods and materials that were used in the 18th century.  It is really interesting for me and I am learning quite a bit.

Below I am hand sanding the molding and curved drawer fronts but I machine sand the flat surfaces.   I wear a dust mask and vacuum up the dust frequently.




I have since finished sanding everything to 180 now.  So only one more pass to get to 220.


Before I can begin to finish the table I have to select the drawer pulls, mount them and then take them off.  
I purchased some awhile ago at a bargain sale  that I thought might work.  But I think it was a false bargain.  It turns out that they are brass coated steel.



I thought I would mount one anyway on a practice drawer front. The size and color are nice but the quality is not there so I have ordered new ones from Ball & Ball.



You can see hear that I bent the escutcheon plate to match the curve of the front.  Then I guessed the angle for the drill and drilled the holes.   Well that did not work.  The angle was way off, so I widened the holes so I could test mount the pull.   But that won't work when I am doing this on the good drawer fronts.



So I measured the angle and made a jig to hold the drawer front so I could drill them perpendicular in the drill press.


The second set of holes in the front were drilled using the jig.  I worked just fine.  But I need to make another for the concave drawer front.


This is a jig for the table saw I made a number of years ago  to cut the wedges at the 15 degree angel
.

Here is today's video: